Gustav's Mill - introduction

by brae  

One of the reasons I cut new walls to make Watson Mill larger on the inside was to accommodate Gustav's hobby.  Turns out, in addition to avid reading, he's a miniaturist.  :D  In researching mini mills, I found this delightful Archistories Windmill "Marienfehn" in Z scale.

Here's a penny to show the size of the pieces.  There's excellent detailing as well.  The pieces seem to be made from some kind of chipboard material, and they recommend the use of wood glue.  There are 10 pages of illustrated instructions, but it seems fairly straightforward.

There's even a motor for it.  Yep, the sails go roundy roundy.  :D  It's a DC 3V motor, so this should work with a battery holder and switch.  I can build a work table to disguise the switch underneath.

For now, I have four of the parts sheets pressed flat since they curled a bit in the kit envelope.

Watson Mill - sails, part 4

by brae  

Continuing work on the windmill sails.  Just a short update that is long on work hours.  I now have four completed sails and will move on to the hub and shaft next.  I had such a hard time getting motivated to do the last three sails after completing the first.  Yes, I can stand the "tedium" of needlework for hours, but this insanity just pushed me over the edge.  haaaaa!  I am glad to move on now.

I think these are just the right size for the facade.

There was a question about whether these weigh more than the mockup versions and if the motor would be able to handle the extra weight.  Interestingly enough, the wood sails weigh the same as the foam core board mockup sails (1.1 ounces on my postal scale).  Of course, the cloth I add later will increase the weight, but the motor should be able to handle it without issue.

The Persian - 6.25 hours

by brae  

Continuing work on the Persian rug.  I'm trying to get back on schedule for monthly updates, so here's the current progress late this month with a total of 6.25 stitching hours.  Since there are so many different colors but tiny areas of coverage, I've tacked multiple needles to the work surface so I can have more than one color threaded at a time.  I am using shorter lengths as well since the poplin is a little hard on the floss.  I also bought 4x maginification readers. :O

Stitched in French knots on printed poplin.

Mod Flowers rug - introduction

by brae  

A few years ago, when I first started making minis, I made a needlepoint rug on 24 count congress cloth based on a real life modern original called Parasols by Thomas Paul.  While it looked lovely in photographs, I was never very happy with the result.

Needlepoint on a lower count can look choppy, especially when there are a lot of curves to the design.  The background also showed through more than I liked, and I ended up with more of an oval than a circle.

I had printed on velour paper, which had a nice texture but still wasn't as realistic as I wanted.

This was all before I had done a French knot rug, though I had considered redoing the design in punchneedle.  I do like punchneedle, but French knots are just such a great texture in miniature.  And, if I feel if I am going to bother doing the work, I might as well do it right.  :D  Considering the crazy detail of the Persian, I plan to start the Mod Flowers in French knots to have a simpler design to work on to offset the madness of the Persian.

I didn't print on fabric as I had for the Persian since I will be making a 7 13/16" diameter rug and the fabric printer sheets are only 8.5" wide.  Not enough to add fabric for an embroidery hoop.  So, I've used the transfer pen and tracing paper method.  This is Aunt Martha's Tracing Paper and Sulky Iron-On transfer pen in black.

I took the velour paper printout and taped it to a sheet of tracing paper.  I taped the paper to the window in the afternoon light and traced the design using a fine point Sharpie.

Jasper was eager to help.

I then flipped the paper over and traced the design with the transfer pen.

Having had shifting issues in the past, I taped the paper to the muslin fabric before ironing.

The design spreads a bit, but it will all be covered in the end.  :]  I just need to shop for more of the colored threads I used on the needlepoint version.

Tribal Foxes Rug - 110.75 hours, stitching complete

by brae  

I've finished stitching the Tribal Foxes rug with a total stitching time of 110.75 hours.  I just need to bind the edges and complete the final finishing.

This was done in full cross stitch with single thread over 32 count Jobelan.

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