Category: "Art, photography"

Carriage Days and Galloway House

by brae  

I spent part of my birthday weekend in Wisconsin. When previously touring the Wesley W. Jung Carriage Museum, we were told about the carriage days event in August, which coincided with my birthday weekend. The event was interesting - the drivers compete for ribbons and come decked out in their finest. It was not easy to capture a good photo of the carriages in motion, and when they were still, they were all grouped together. It was great to see these vintage vehicles in motion, to hear the creak of the wood and leather as they moved over the grass.

The event included a horse-drawn carriage ride around the grounds to the event circle, the historic Wade House Stagecoach Hotel, the blacksmith shop and saw mill. Things were a little disorganized, but it was still a great day to tour and see interesting historical attractions. The hotel tour was a little long, so we skipped around to take photos and left early. It's definitely worthwhile to visit both the museum and the surrounding property.

 

After that we headed to Galloway House and Village in Fond Du Lac, Wisconsin. What a beautiful house!

There were not many people around, so we were able to take our time. I spied this interesting lamp in the parlor.

Just like the Chrysolite lamps I made for the Haunted Heritage bathroom (I left off the reflectors for mine).

There are a lot of surrounding buildings you can tour (self-guided). What was interesting to me were the antique items intended for actual handling by guests, something that is rather rare. Of course, the main attraction for me was their old mail wagon.

It's in rather rough shape, but it was great to be able to see inside and get close.

The sign on it reads:

This 1921 horse drawn mail buggy was used to deliver mail for 7 years by Mr. Frank Brodzeller.

This was a 38-mile route in rural Lomira, Dodge County, Wisconsin and served 165 families.

In late 1927, after traveling 5,794 miles using 4 different horses, Brodzeller gave way to the automobile and retired his horse and buggy.

After 39 years and 7 months, 400,000 plus miles, 4 horses and 20 automobiles, Brodzeller retired. A safe driving award was given to him along with an excellent service award by a Lomira Citizen group.

Brodzeller then, with a borrowed horse, used this mail buggy once again to deliver his last mail to Lomira Route #1. There were many of his friends waiting for the mail, to bid this final farewell. All relived the early days of 1921.

This buggy was later donated by Brodzeller to the Galloway Carriage House Museum.

There is so much more than these two highlights, and I highly recommend a visit if you like history and antiques even in the slightest.

Intermission - but back to work soon

by brae  

As Sheila points out, they are both actually in my chair...but one good yank of the blanket, and the chair is free for me.  haaaaaaaa!

I had a short road trip vacation and am now back at it. More mini updates soon....

Revisiting...

by brae  

While I am trying to get motivated to mini (and blog) more consistently, I am participating in a daily challenge on Instagram for the May Mini Makers.  :D  I hope to complete it each day, but I can already tell there will be a couple I need to think on.  It has been fun going through old pics, though.  I have been keeping this blog for nearly a decade!  :O

Here's the photo set up for my Halloween 2013 scene for the first day's challenge.  Check out my Instagram page for the rest.

Wesley W. Jung Carriage Museum

by brae  

This past weekend, my boyfriend and I visited the Wesley W. Jung Carriage Museum at the Wade House historical site in Greenbush, WI.  It's a 20,000 square-foot museum with some of the finest carriages and displays I've seen.  It has been cold and snowy in the area, so I hope that is why there weren't many visitors.  It's a great place that maybe people take for granted.  But, maybe it's more seasonal when people can tour the grounds and partake in festivities in warmer months.  Even though we didn't go to the other places in the complex, the carriage museum alone was worth the visit.

There's a gorgeous stagecoach before you reach the ticket counter, and you can climb inside.  There's an automated speaker that gives you a fun experience, and a gift shop with a lot of vintage candies.

Since we were the only visitors, the curator Jim gave us a guided tour of some of the more relevant carriages for my RFD build.  While they didn't have an actual mail wagon in the collection, there were a couple that had similar suspensions and features to various mail wagons I've seen in my research.  After this helpful start, we roamed the museum, making two full laps to take it all in.

This tobacco wagon was the closest in size and type of suspension, at least for the front.

I was able to get some great photos of the underside that showed me how it was all put together.  Much of this was made from metal.  I don't plan to recreate in metal, but I think I can get a nice replication in other materials.

There was a great side room that showed the springs and wheel construction, as well as how it was all put together.

This milk wagon has sliding interior doors, which I've seen in some of the mail wagons.

This carriage has a closer match to the back suspension I've seen in mail wagons.

There were a few horse models on display, so I was also able to get some great shots of the harness setup.

I have some library books to peruse as well, which I will detail separately, but it was awesome to see examples in person.

Paint Nite, in miniature, of course

by brae  

A friend invited me to a Paint Nite event at a local restaurant.  From the link here, you can see the Halloween themed painting the artist and host Sarah Benkin would be teaching.  I had never been to one of these, but painting a haunted house and having a cocktail sounded like a lovely way to spend a school night.  :D  

Of course, I brought three mini sized canvases instead of using the provided canvas.  The mini canvases were made using textured note cards glued to mat board with spray adhesive and then coated with white acrylic.  I taped the three mini canvases to a scrap of plywood to have something to use as an easel.  I'm ready to paint, with a Scotch chaser.

A couple of years ago, April sent me a fabulous set of brushes and clay tools called a Bundle Monster that were invaluable.

I supplemented with a couple of other brushes just in case (not shown here).

I attempted the smallest of the three canvases first, but I had a hard time making circular motions that small.  My moon was a messy, light blue oval, so I scrapped that and moved on to the medium one.  Much better.

The instructor was a lot of fun, and there was a good group of ladies at the event.  Many used other colors for their moons.  It was so interesting to see all the different works starting from the same image, just like the Creatin' Contest each year ends with so many diverse structures.  :]

I skipped the cats in my painting and made the fence and grass more moonlit.  I thought bright white images would detract from the house in my small scale.  I had a lot of fun and could see myself packing mini canvases and attending more of these in the future.

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